We’re bringing you something special this week. Something that only enrolled Factory45 entrepreneurs would usually get… 

Back in January, Denisha Ferguson, who is one of our Alumni Mentors, hosted a live workshop about goal setting for our Factory45 students.

It received such great feedback that we’ve decided to bring the workshop and Denisha’s methodology to all of you.

Denisha is an expert goal setter, having used the “SMART” method to plan and execute Indiana Fashion Week. And on Thursday, she’s going to help you set goals and targets you’ll actually achieve.

So join us this Thursday, March 10th at 12:30pm ET for this week’s episode of Factory45 LIVE! 

There are two ways to watch:

  • Stream on YouTube here.
  • Watch in our private Facebook group here.

3/10 Live Show: Goal Setting with Denisha

ALSO! Have you requested your invite to our private 4-day workshop next week? If you’re serious about starting your sustainable fashion or accessories brand this year, apply for this free opportunity to work with me here.

 


ON THE PODCAST THIS WEEK:

      Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


As someone who works with and mentors new entrepreneurs on a regular basis, I’m no stranger to panicked emails popping up in my inbox about the discovery of a competitor. As soon as we discover potential competition, our cortisol levels shoot through the roof and we imagine the worst case scenario. In today’s episode, I’m talking about why competition is actually a good thing, even when it gives you a panic attack. 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Request an invite to the Workshop March 14-17th

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries



TRANSCRIPT

Hello, everyone and welcome back! I have an important announcement at the end of this episode, so make sure to listen to the end… so you don’t miss it.

Have you ever had these thoughts?

You see another brand on Instagram and you think, “Gah, that’s pretty much what I’m doing.”

Or “She’s selling the same thing I am.”

Or “I just found out this person is also making the same product, so what’s the point in me even trying?”

As someone who works with and mentors new entrepreneurs on a regular basis, I’m no stranger to panicked emails popping up in my inbox about the discovery of a competitor.

“And she’s so much farther along!”

“And they already have 3,000 followers on Instagram!”

“They’re using organic cotton and making it in the USA, too!”

As soon as we discover potential competition, our cortisol levels shoot through the roof and we imagine the worst case scenario.

EVERYONE is going to buy from THEM instead of ME.

So I might as well quit.

And while yes, quitting is the easiest route to take (in any situation) there are many more reasons to keep going.

In Eric Ries’ book, The Lean Startup, he says early-stage entrepreneurs spend too much time worrying about their idea being stolen and not enough time telling as many people about it as possible.

As a startup, Ries says you should focus on talking about your idea to anyone and everyone willing to listen. That’s the only way to get early customer feedback, hear what your potential customers actually want and find out if your idea is a viable business.

There is a big difference between someone saying you have a great idea and actually getting out their wallet to pay for it.

When early stage entrepreneurs worry too much about protecting their idea, Eric Ries calls this “stealth mode.”

He says: “Part of the special challenge of being a startup is the near impossibility of having your idea company, or product be noticed by anyone, let alone a competitor.”

Makes sense, right? Stealing an idea is a lot different than stealing an idea and actually implementing it — especially an idea that hasn’t proven to be successful yet.

If you do reach a degree of success down the road, then competitors are bound to enter the market. People see something that works, and they want to have a piece of it — this comes with the territory.

The thing is, as hard as it may be to take it gracefully in the moment, competition is a good thing — it pushes us to continue innovating and prevents us from getting stagnant. 

So, with that all said, here are some other things to consider the next time you’re faced with copycats or competition that makes your stomach flip: 

  • An idea is just an idea. Everyone has them. What sets you apart is your ability to execute. 99% of ideas never see the light of day, so if you’re able to get your product to market, then you’re already that much farther ahead than everyone else. So much of entrepreneurship is simply a matter of keeping your head down and doing the work. It’s not glamorous, but there’s really no alternative.
  • The “me versus them” mentality is the fastest way to sabotage yourself. As soon as you start thinking the world is against you and the universe is set up for you to fail, then it’s over. I’ve never met a successful entrepreneur who didn’t operate with an “abundance mentality.” Repeat after me: there are enough customers for me and there are enough customers for them.
  • Competition breeds creativity. Having competitors in the market forces you to innovate, think outside the box and pushes you to do better than you would have done if you had a monopoly. While it may give you anxiety at first, you have the ability to reframe how it makes you feel. It can either deflate you or empower you — and you have the power to choose.
  • Competition shows you there is a need in the marketplace. Having other players in the game means there is a big enough pool of people who want what you’re selling. The market share is there and it’s your job to find a way to take a piece of the pie.
  • The great news about being in the clothing business is that, unless you’re selling to nudists, everyone needs it. Fashion is a $1.5 trillion dollar industry. That’s a lot of people buying clothing. And the average American buys 62 pieces of clothing a year. As fast fashion continues to gross more people out, you’re there to provide an alternative ethical option. How cool is that?
  • And this. This is the best reason of all: Despite how many people are selling (or plan to sell) something similar to you, no one is ever going to do it the same way you are. That’s just fact. There is no one else on this planet that is even remotely close to the same person as you and thus, the way you create is going to be different from everyone else. 

No matter how many new kids lines or womenswear lines or outwear lines debut, they’re all going to be unique to their creator. And that’s why it’s so important to know who your target customer is. It relieves you from having to sell to “everyone” so you can focus on selling to the special group of people it’s made for. There is so much freedom in that.

I’ve talked about competition a lot on the blog, in my live shows, and with my Factory45 entrepreneurs – it’s the topic that continues to come up because it’s so much scarier when you’re just starting out.

Working with mostly women entrepreneurs has taught me how sensitive most of us are. We want perfection, we want everything to go the right way the first time, and we want to show everyone around us that we can do it.

As soon as we hit a bump in the road, we tend to question our intentions.

We say to ourselves, Who was I to think I could pull this off?

When really, who are you not to?

Okay, so my big announcement – on March 14th I’m hosting a free four-day workshop that will teach you the essential building blocks of starting a sustainable fashion brand in 2022. But here’s the thing, this year I’m hosting it as a private, invite-only event for a select group of people who are serious about starting their brands this year. The good news is, if that sounds like you, you can request an invite by going to the link in the description below. So make sure to check that out, see if it looks like something that could help you take action this year and request your invite to join me from March 14th to 17th!

I looked up from my computer and thought to myself,

“Man, I should really be working.”

I glanced at the clock. Two hours had passed since I last looked at it.

It took me a second to process that in that time, I had written our March Workshop landing page, revised the outline for the workshop and edited the captions for a series of Instagram ads.

“Oh, so I was working.”

Has that ever happened to you?

You get so caught up in your work that you look up and realize your work didn’t actually feel like work?

It’s what productivity experts call the “flow state.”

And it’s what I’ll be talking about during this week’s Live Show. I’m going to be sharing four easy steps to getting “in flow” when you sit down to work on your fashion brand.

And I promise, it will help you get more done in less time than ever before.

So, join me on Thursday, March 3rd at 12:30pm ET for this week’s episode of Factory45 LIVE!

3/3 Live Show: A Simple Productivity Booster

There are two ways to watch:

  • Stream on YouTube here. (Make sure you’re subscribed to my channel so you get notified when live shows are starting!)
  • Watch in our private Facebook group here.

See you on Thursday!

 

P.S. Did you catch our February podcast round-up? Binge-listen to all of the episodes we released last month here.


ON THE PODCAST THIS WEEK:

      Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


If you missed January’s announcement, I’m sending out a monthly round-up of podcast episodes on the last day of each month…

This will make it super easy for you to binge the episodes all at once (every episode is less than 20 minutes!)

Here’s what we released in February:

Ep. 07 Instagram Growth for Fashion Brands: 3 Key Strategies (12 mins)

You already know that you need an Instagram account for your fashion brand. But with algorithms always changing, the growth, reach and engagement can feel pretty slow and disappointing… in this episode, I’m sharing three key strategies to grow your following as a fashion startup on Instagram.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 08 What to Do When You Don’t Know Where to Start (9 mins)

In this episode, I’m walking you through the first 3 steps you need to take to start your company. The best part is, each of these three steps will take no longer than an hour to do. (Actually, each one will probably take less than 30 minutes!)

My goal here, and the goal of the Factory45 program, is to make “I don’t know where to start” obsolete. My goal is to show you that “knowing where to start” is a lot easier than you think. Ready?

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 09 When to Invest in Your Fashion Business (& Where to Start for Free) (8 mins)

So, here’s a hot topic: Money. More specifically, how to start a business when you don’t have a lot of money. If you scour the internet, you can find enough stories of multi-millionaires who started from zero, eating chickpeas out of the can while sleeping on their friend’s futon. But there’s a less extreme version of this, and it’s far more common… so, in this episode we’re talking about how to know If you’re ready to invest in your fashion brand.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 10 How to Source Sustainable Fabrics for Your Fashion Brand (13 mins)

I want you to start thinking about the supply chain for your fashion brand — while the marketing, audience building and business planning elements of creating your brand are important (and fun), your supply chain is what needs to come together to create your physical product. I recommend prioritizing your fabric search right now — no matter where you are in the process. And I’m going to help you do that in today’s episode.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Remember, there are additional resources linked below every episode for you to get started and take action : )

 


The other day I was on a podcast interview and the host asked me the one thing I wish I had done sooner when starting Factory45.

My answer?

Hiring.

For the past eight years, I’ve always seen steady growth in my business but it wasn’t until 2021 when I brought on three new integral team members that things really took off.

They say you’re only as strong as the people around you and that couldn’t be more true over here at Factory45.

So it’s that team that I want to introduce you to today : ) 


Emily Belyea | Creative Director | Evergreen, Colorado

Most-loved fashion item: Cropped Mockneck Sweater from Factory45’er VETTA. It’s simultaneously the most lovely and most comfortable thing I own.


Bee Dean | Content Manager | Boca Raton, Florida

Most-loved fashion item: Gray Sherpa Sweater. It goes with everything, super comfy, washes well, and it’s gray, so it’s always on trend.


Hannah McDermott | Director of Enrollment | San Diego, CA

Most-loved fashion item: Chambray shirt – the one I’m wearing in this photo! It quite literally went around the world with me, one of the few items I brought on all my travels since it was so versatile. 


Maddi Neufeld | Director of Operations | Galway, Ireland

Most-loved fashion item: Forest green sweater dress from TWO THIRDS. I love that I can wear it at home or out and I feel cozy and elegant. 


Melina Dio | Podcast Manager | Boston, Massachusetts

Most-loved fashion item: Black midi dress. It is smocked at the bodice and flows out and down from there. I love it because it is so versatile and comfortable.


Erika Radcliffe | Client Tech Support | Las Vegas, Nevada

Most-loved fashion item: Black chenille sweater that I bought from a little store in Vermont. It’s stylish and cozy and at the time I bought it I thought I was spending too much, but I’ve ended up wearing it regularly for 5 years!


Shannon Lohr (that’s me!) | Founder & CEO | San Diego, California

Most-loved fashion item: Wide-Brim Felt Wool Hat from Factory45’er LIYA Collective. It’s the perfect sun-blocking accessory here in Southern California and it’s one of those pieces I know I’ll have for years to come. 


And of course, we can’t forget our amazing Alumni Mentors who keep the Factory45 program running with 1:1 student support.

I will say, hiring is one of the most challenging parts of growing a business. But when you take the time and energy to train, nurture and develop the right team of people, it’s one of the best things that can happen to you as an entrepreneur and CEO.

So, consider this a little team appreciation day and I hope wherever you are in your business-building journey, you’re surrounded by great people, too.

 

 

P.S. Join me during Thursday’s Live Show for our monthly Fashion Startup Q+A! Email me with your questions or bring them LIVE on Feb. 17th at 12:30pm ET!


ON THE PODCAST:

      Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


where to start

I get email after email from people who have an idea for a clothing line or product but they don’t know how to make it happen. 

How do I know what fabric I need? 

How do I create sketches if I can’t draw? 

How do I organize all of my ideas? And which one should I choose?

Instead of zooming in on one thing to tackle first, they find themselves paralyzed by the overwhelm of everything else. 

And they end up doing nothing.

The thing is, starting a fashion brand is a lot more straightforward than most people think. And so much of the process can be tackled when you decide to… 

Simplify.

And that’s what I’ll be talking about on this week’s Live Show – 

What do you do when you don’t know where to start?

I’m going to share the first three action steps that I recommend taking before you do anything else.

Instead of doing more research, or sketching more designs, or playing with one more color scheme, these are three tangible things you can do to make real progress in moving forward.

So, join us on Thursday, Feb. 3rd at 12:30pm ET for this week’s episode of Factory45 LIVE!

Where to Start

There are two ways to watch:

    • Stream on YouTube here. (Make sure you’re subscribed to my channel so you get notified when live shows are starting!) 
    • Watch in our private Facebook group here.

See you on Thursday!

 

P.S. Did you catch our January podcast round-up? Binge-listen to all of the episodes we released last month here.


ON THE PODCAST THIS WEEK:

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


book a call

Podcast Round-Up

To celebrate the launch of our podcast, I’m starting a new monthly email series to round-up all of the episodes of the past month.

This will make it really easy for you to binge the episodes all at once (every episode is less than 20 minutes!)

So, without further ado, here’s what we released in January:

Ep. 01 How to Start a Sustainable Fashion Brand (9 minutes)

You want to start a sustainable fashion brand that’s ethically manufactured and eco-friendly, that’s why you’re here. The question is: Where do you start? What does it mean to be “sustainable” and what are some of the most important things you should keep in mind as you build your brand? That’s what I’m going to share with you in today’s episode.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 02 This is a Required Trait of a Fashion Entrepreneur (4 minutes)

If you truly want to be an entrepreneur, then it virtually guarantees you will run into problems — in the beginning, it will probably be on a daily basis. But to reach any level of success, problems require problem solvers. There’s no way around it. In this episode, I’m talking about the main trait required of an entrepreneur.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 03 Write a Business Plan for Your Fashion Brand in 5 Easy Steps (20 minutes)

Back in 2010, I was starting a fashion brand that was sustainably and ethically made in the USA but at the time, I didn’t have any experience in fashion or manufacturing. I was a journalism major in college, my then-cofounder was a business major so when we were first starting out we followed the traditional business advice… And in this episode, I want to make sure you don’t make the same mistake.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 04 Coming Out as a Fashion Entrepreneur & How to Deal with Critics (8 minutes)

In last week’s episode, I talked about entrepreneurship, resilience and the importance of getting comfortable with failure. I argued that resilience is a skill that can be practiced. I also argued that, for most of us, it’s a necessary reprogramming if we learned to avoid failure growing up. And in today’s episode, I want to take this a step further…

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 05 How to Build a Following Before You Launch Your Fashion Brand (14 minutes)

Today we are talking about a topic that is near and dear to my heart — and it’s something that most new fashion founders generally avoid doing. In this episode, I’m sharing four ways to build an audience before you launch your fashion brand.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Ep. 06 6 Eco-Friendly Fabrics for Your Sustainable Fashion Brand (6 minutes)

If you’re looking for eco-friendly fabrics for your sustainable fashion brand, then this is the episode for you. I’m going to share the pros and cons of six of my favorite eco-friendly fabrics.

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


Remember, there are additional resources linked below every episode for you to get started and take action : )

“See” you on the Live Show next week!

 


outsource

The oven was preheating…   

The ingredients were on the counter…

The recipe was in front of me…

As I stood face-to-face with the mini muffin tin.

It was January 10th – the eve of my son’s birthday – and that could only mean one thing:

The 4th annual Great Muffin Fiasco.

That’s right, since 2019, I have attempted to bake muffins to bring into school for my kid’s birthday.

A simple task, right?

But somehow, every year, January 10th ends with me scraping crumbly remnants out of the tin in an attempt to salvage just enough for each classmate to get one.

This year, I knew to make 24 muffins in an effort to get 12. 

This year, I knew to use eggs instead of chia seeds and water.

This year, I forgot the muffin tins.

(Oh, and the baking powder.)

You would think that a seasoned entrepreneur, a CEO, and an all-around capable human could learn from and handle this task year after year, but as my husband so lovingly put it:

“You’re great at a lot of things, Shan… baking doesn’t have to be one of them.”

And this is what I may have finally accepted after four years… I’m just never going to be that mom.

There are the moms that create train-shaped pancakes on the morning of their four year old’s birthday.

And there are the moms that stick a candle in a piece of peanut butter toast and call it a day.

I am, quite certainly, the latter.

My mistake was not realizing this sooner.

And it’s the same mistake I see new entrepreneurs making every day:

Stop trying to be all the things, do all the things, and force all the things to be perfect.

Can you outsource a few social media tasks to an intern?

Can you stop making Tiktok videos if you really hate being on video?

Can you hire a patternmaker instead of trying to learn a new software?

What can you outsource or stop doing so that you can focus on the things you’re great at?

Because here’s the thing:

You can’t be great at everything – and that’s okay.

It’s also okay to not be great at something and still do it anyway.

You just have to be willing to accept the imperfect version. 

So that when you drop off a container of bottomless minimuffins that resemble a pile of, well… you know… 

You can simply smile at the teacher and say,

“I hope it’s enough.”

 

 


ON THE PODCAST:

  • Ep. 04: Coming Out as a Fashion Entrepreneur & How to Deal with Critics 

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify

  • GIVEAWAY! I’m giving away a free 1:1 Strategy Session with me to help launch or grow your brand this year!

Here’s how to enter: 

      1. Listen to Start Your Sustainable Fashion Brand: The Podcast
      2. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts
      3. Screenshot your review and reply back to this email!

*The winner will be chosen on Monday, Jan. 24!*


THIS WEEK’S LIVE SHOW: Fashion Startup Q+A | Ask Shannon 

  • Stream on YouTube here.
  • Watch in our private Facebook group here.
  • Have a question to submit for the Q+A? Leave a comment on YouTube or on FB!

Book Call

critics

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


In last week’s episode I talked about entrepreneurship, resilience and the importance of getting comfortable with failure. I argued that resilience is a skill that can be practiced. I also argued that, for most of us, it’s a necessary reprogramming if we learned to avoid failure growing up. And in today’s episode, I want to take this a step further…  

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Dr. Brene Brown’s TED Talk: Why Your Critics Aren’t the Ones Who Count  

Factory45, The Business School For Sustainable Fashion Entrepreneurs.

Book a call to learn more about launching your fashion brand with Factory45.



TRANSCRIPT 

In last week’s episode I talked about entrepreneurship, resilience and the importance of getting comfortable with failure. I argued that resilience is a skill that can be practiced. I also argued that, for most of us, it’s a necessary reprogramming if we learned to avoid failure growing up. And in today’s episode, I want to take this a step further…  

After a decade of talking to entrepreneurs and people just starting their businesses, I’ve had a realization over the years about our collective fear of failure. What I realized is that, generally speaking, It isn’t the act of failing itself that’s the most terrifying to us. it’s the external connections we make to it.

If we fail, we’ll lose our dignity.

If we fail, we’ll lose our life savings.

If we fail, we’ll lose our home.

While these are extreme examples, I know our thinking can often go to “worst-case-scenario.”

I remember a conversation that was brought up by one of the entrepreneurs in Factory45, my business school for fashion startups. She said:

I’m looking for advice: Having just finished my master’s degree, it may come as a surprise to some family and friends who don’t know about my project yet that I’m going the entrepreneurship route. Anyone have tips on how to introduce a significant career change to family, friends, and/or even an employer (I plan to keep my full-time job for a while)?

And This got me thinking about the “pre-failure phase.”

Before the fear of failure is even an option, first there is the fear of getting started. It’s the fear of taking the plunge. Of not knowing what’s going to happen. Of worrying what your family and friends are going to think.

The greatest inhibitor to becoming an entrepreneur or pursuing a great idea or moving forward with your true life’s work is — never getting started in the first place.

When we make it public and declare our idea to the world, We simultaneously have to face the feeling of being seen.

Being seen means you open yourself to critics, you open yourself to the doubters, and you open yourself to vulnerability in a way you probably haven’t before.

Throw in the visibility of social media to the mix and the stakes feel a whole lot higher.

Personally, I’m no stranger to critics. While the supporters in my life far outweigh the cynics, it doesn’t make the occasional negativity sting any less.

Back in 2013 I wrote an expose about fast fashion for The Huffington Post and then I made the mistake of reading the comments section. I was called an asshole, a “self-aggrandizing bitch,” a piece of shit and other equally flattering names. (And yes, this is why you should never read the comments).

And you wouldn’t believe how long it took for me to be taken seriously in business. For my first five years of entrepreneurship, I faced family and friends at Christmas parties, dinner parties and happy hours, wondering when I’m going to get a “real job.”

If you stay in the game long enough, you get a lot of practice at what I call the “shoulder slide.” You have to train yourself to let comments and negativity slide off your shoulders. And while an off-putting email or comment can still throw off my day at times, I can tell you it does get easier.

So, if you’re one of those people, who is tinkering with a great idea, a new business or an alternative career path, remember this:

The critics, the doubters, the cynics only have power if you give them the power.

As hard as it may be, you can consciously accept that there will always be some degree of negativity coming at you, but you can also consciously choose how you react to it.

Power is energy. And you’re the only one who gets to decide where to put that energy. It can either be your demise or… your strength.

Here are a few other strategies to keep in your back pocket: when negativity or criticism starts creeping in — either internally or from outsiders:

  • Stay close to those who support your dreams. and let you talk about it obsessively, even though they don’t understand what you’re talking about.
  • Speak from a place of vulnerability. Don’t predict the reaction you’re going to get, because it will come out in your tone.
  • At the end of the day, your opinion is the only one that matters. (It really is.) At the end of the day, you are responsible for your life.
  • Remember that the vast majority of negative reactions are usually from people that have never tried to make their own dreams a reality. << That’s a big one – It’s easy to be critical of something you’ve never done yourself.
  • Walk into the conversation with the mindset that approval is not the goal – information is. You want those around you to be part of the vision, to be in inquiry with you… so try to make it a two-way and engaging conversation.

If you know me, then you know I’m a big fan of Dr. Brene Brown, who is a researcher on vulnerability and shame. She has a few viral TED talks, but she did another talk that’s not as well known called, “Why Your Critics Aren’t the Ones Who Count.” It’s a must watch — even if you’re the most confident person on the planet, so I’ll link to that video in the description.

The outside criticism and doubters are also why it’s so important to surround yourself with likeminded people working towards a similar goal. This is why, for my entire entrepreneurial career, I’ve been in group business programs or worked with a coach. The energy you get from other entrepreneurs — in all different stages of business — is what will keep you going in the long run. Especially on the extra hard days.

Factory45 is the community I created for fashion entrepreneurs who are looking for that camaraderie, mentorship and support. If you’re interested in launching your brand with us, you can book a consult call to explore the opportunity more. The link to set an appointment is in the description below. We’d love to chat.

Required Trait

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify


If you truly want to be an entrepreneur, then it virtually guarantees you will run into problems — in the beginning, it will probably be on a daily basis. But to reach any level of success, problems require problem solvers. There’s no way around it. In this episode, I’m talking about the main trait required of an entrepreneur.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Book a call to learn more about launching your fashion brand with Factory45.



TRANSCRIPT 

The other day I was watching my three-year-old play with his train set. 

One piece of track… connected to another piece of track… connected to another… 

And then, uh oh.

The last piece wouldn’t fit.

I watched as he struggled to fit the piece, as it kept hitting up against the wall of the table, as he got more and more frustrated.

“I CAN’T DO IT!” he yelled out, red in the face. “IT DOESN’T WORK!”

And I started to think… How many times as an entrepreneur have I felt this?

Why won’t the web domain connect to the host?!

I changed the file size and the image still won’t upload!

Why won’t the email form populate correctly?!

The difference is, I can’t throw my computer across the room like I could a wooden train track.

One of the main messages you hear as a parent is the importance of building resilience in your kids.

It’s why you should resist doing things for them that they can do themselves or providing the easy way out. 

And honestly, entrepreneurship is very much the same.

The very best entrepreneurs, the ones who are successful, are quite simply: resilient.

When something isn’t working the way they want it to, they muster up all of their resourcefulness to find a solution.

They don’t take no for an answer. 

They don’t give up.

But they also know when to ask for help.

Because honestly, that’s what it takes.

If you truly want to be an entrepreneur, then it virtually guarantees you will run into problems — in the beginning, it will probably be on a daily basis.

But to reach any level of success, problems require problem solvers.

There’s no way around it.

And here’s where we went wrong: for most of us, the first 18 years of our lives were spent developing an aversion to failing. We were taught that failure is bad, to avoid any form of failure at all costs — get the grades, excel at the sport, earn the lead role in the play. 

How many of us were told we weren’t “musically gifted” because we didn’t immediately pick up the recorder at the age of eight?

How many of us were told, “Oh, your sister is the sporty one. You’re more of the artistic type.”

When in reality it would have benefited us to really struggle with learning how to play “Mary Had a Little Lamb” on the recorder or trying out for the soccer team anyway and experience the disappointment of getting cut.

How would those failures along the way prepare us for success down the road?

Because what we all eventually realize is, to reach the levels of success that we strive for as adults — starting the business, launching the brand, scaling the company — it virtually requires us to be comfortable with failure.

To achieve anything great, you must be willing to fail.

So my question for you is, How can you build more resilience into the day to day creation of your business?

That’s all to say, how can you be the toddler who picks up the train track even after he throws it… 

And tries again.

If you want to make this the year of entrepreneurship, resilience and so much more, this is your invitation to talk more about how we can work together to help you achieve your goal of launching your own sustainable fashion brand. Book a call with us to learn more about launching your brand through Factory45 – go to factory45.co and click “book a call” and we’ll get something on the calendar. We’re really excited to talk to you.