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childrenswear

How the Founder of SproutFit Raised Over $14K to Start a Childrenswear Brand

How do you start a business when you’re a busy parent and working full-time in corporate America?

Whitney Sokol, the founder of SproutFit, is going to tell us.

I’ve introduced you to Whitney through a blog post she wrote about her experience in Factory45.

But tomorrow, she’s going to share the exact steps she took to launch her brand while working on it part time.

Join me and Whitney tomorrow, 5/24 for a live, on-camera interview about how SproutFit came to life in just nine months.

In this episode of Factory45 LIVE, Whitney will tell us:

  • How she came up with the idea and what she did to get started.
  • The steps she took to set up her supply chain and find a manufacturer.
  • How she raised over $14K for her first production run.
  • What she did to find her first customers even before she launched.
  • And she’ll answer your questions…

Whitney is a straight shooter and a goldmine of insight into what it takes to launch a startup clothing brand.

Bring your own questions and we’ll open it up to live Q+A at the end of the call.

It’s all going down tomorrow, Wednesday, 5/24 at 3pm ET / 12pm PT and space is limited to just 100 spots!

Register to join us here.

“See” you soon,

factory45 owner shannon

 


Market45

new designer, advice

What’s My One Piece of Advice for New Designers?

Whenever anyone asks me:

What’s your one piece of advice for new designers?

I always have the same answer. I’ve worked with hundreds of entrepreneurs over the years, and I warn all of them of the same mistakes that I made when I was first starting out in the fashion industry.

Let me take you back to the summer of 2012. I’m living out of a 1993 Chevy Conversion van on a three-month “sustainable fashion tour” of the Pacific Northwest.

Van-Roadtrip, new designer, advice

Six months prior, my co-founder and I had launched the highest-funded fashion project in Kickstarter history to fund the production of our first piece, the Versalette by {r}evolution apparel. We were on a mission to shake up the fashion industry, to prove that less is more, and to show everyone that conscious consumerism can change the world.

By working with a sew shop in the U.S., sourcing 100% recycled, U.S.-made fabric, and considering every tiny part of our supply chain, we had attracted the attention of 1,400 first customers, in addition to media outlets such as The New York Times.

But that’s not where we started.

My journey into fashion production began a year and a half earlier when my co-founder and I first came up with the idea to start a “sustainable clothing company.” We had no idea what that really meant, so we blindly began contacting any person we thought had the slightest chance of helping us.

We called organic cotton farmers in Texas, environmental studies professors in Missouri, eco-fashion models in Brooklyn, Merino wool suppliers in New Zealand and the list goes on…

Looking back at the emails I sent to suppliers, I know now that my inquiries surely got a swift click of the delete button. I didn’t know how to talk to industry veterans, I had no idea how to talk “the talk,” and it showed.

Eventually though, after a year and a half of trying, we found fabric and materials that fit our sustainability guidelines, a sew shop who would work with a fledgling startup, and that’s when we successfully funded our Kickstarter campaign.

If we thought sourcing was difficult, we couldn’t have imagined what the production process had in store for us.

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First hurdle, the organic cotton drawstrings we needed were on backorder and the sew shop couldn’t move forward until they had all materials in-house. We got bumped off their production calendar and couldn’t get back on until the drawstrings arrived.

By the time we began production, we were running four months late.

The backordered drawstrings, production delays and an additional shipping fiasco were rookie mistakes we had to live with and learn from.

But the next mistake we made was the biggest one of all — and it’s the only thing from this story that you really need to remember:

We weren’t at the sew shop when production started.

Sure, we signed off on samples and patterns, but the worst decision we made was not being with our production team when Versalettes started coming off the line.

We weren’t there to offer additional quality control, answer questions in person, build relationships with our sewers and get them invested in our project.

And it came back to bite us.

Our first shipment of Versalettes arrived and a third of them had crooked pockets, misplaced button holes, lost drawstrings or unfinished seams. We got a second shipment and it had the same problem. The sew shop was sending us batches of 40 units at a time and instead of being thrilled to open them, I was terrified.

At the time, it would have been easy to blame the sewers for being “unskilled,” but that simply wasn’t the truth.

Being completely new to the industry, we didn’t know how crucially important it was to a build relationships with our sew shop and be there at the beginning of production.

We had no one to blame but ourselves.

When you’re first starting out, trying to do design and marketing and media outreach and customer service and blogging and everything else yourself, it can be easy to take production for granted and assume someone else is handling it.

The thing is, no one is ever going to care about your product as much as you do.

new designer, advice

After we received our second batch of Versalettes, I flew to North Carolina to visit our sew shop and work out the “kinks.” I spoke to each sewer individually, shared the article about us from The New York Times, and showed them photos of our models wearing the Versalette.

Spending a few days with our team, I finally understood that relationship building in the manufacturing industry is no different than in any other industry.

Shortly after I flew back to the west coast, our third shipment arrived.

Not a mistake in the bunch.

 

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This originally appeared as a guest post on Startup FASHION here.

Photo credit: {r}evolution apparel


Making It: Startup Advice from the Founder of Bhava

Francisca Pineda is the founder and designer of Bhava, a conscious footwear company. We first met in NYC last year for lunch, and I learned that not only is she a designer, but she also organizes sustainable fashion retreats in Costa Rica and teaches ethical design classes at FIT.

Today, Francisca is digging deep into her advice for new designers and giving us an insider’s perspective into what it’s like to be a business owner in the fashion industry. From sourcing to sketching to marketing, Francisca is a pro at what she does and it shows. Enjoy!

How did you get started launching Bhava?

I think like most other designers, it started because I couldn’t find what I wanted in the market place. After graduating from Parsons, I started working for a high-end apparel brand and was in charge of all of their accessories. By the time I launched Bhava I had experience in every category of accessory design.

Launching Bhava was something I had actually started planning back in 2009. We had the name and logo ready but the timing wasn’t right and I had gotten a job offer I couldn’t refuse. At that time, I knew I wanted to make an ethical collection but didn’t truly understand “ethical fashion” or the importance of using environmentally-conscious materials.

It wasn’t until a few years later that I started learning about the devastation caused by the leather industry, as well as fast fashion manufacturing. This “awakening” happened after I personally witnessed the disabling effects of the toxic chemicals used in the majority of leather production. Soon after, I became obsessed with learning about all aspects of the chemicals being used, the workers who were exposed, and the “dead zones” that this industry creates.

I started taking all the  Ethical Fashion classes offered at FIT, and attending any sustainability or ethical fashion events that I heard of to continue to learn and connect with others. Once you learn the importance of our decisions as designers and consumers, it’s pretty difficult to go back. I made a personal promise to myself to make a change, because the thought of profiting from such a destructive system was no longer an option for me. And this is ultimately what gives me the drive to keep going with Bhava.

I believe we are all drawn to our unique causes and experiences. I chose to embrace the challenge and proceed full steam ahead. When the time was right we started slowly testing only a few styles at a time. You have no idea what you don’t know until you start! Sizing, fit, pricing, and what colors or materials people respond to are what I feel are really important to test in the beginning. Although it sounds so risky to start a fashion brand these days, it is possible to be cautious and thoughtful in planning a collection so there is as little risk as possible involved.

ALDEN BOOT IN NUDE HAND PAINTED CORK-2

What does a “typical” day look like for you?

Every day is different, but in general I am not a morning person. I prefer to start work later in the day and into the night and spend the beginning of my day on self-care. This includes a short focus meditation, oil pulling, some light core yoga, and fresh turmeric tea with lemon.

Usually, I try to get through the urgent e-mails with production, delivery, sales, and customer service first.  I work with manufacturers in different time zones so it’s important for me to reply to them right away. All of this usually takes half of my day.  When it’s time to sketch and look at materials (my favorite part) it’s usually in the afternoon when I am more relaxed.

Lately, I am most excited about bringing beautiful new materials to the market. I spend about a third of my year traveling to find new and exciting materials. Last season, I was in Europe and next week I will be away for a month in India, and the UAE.  I never know what I will find, it is always an adventure and that excitement and spontaneity translates into each collection.

Tell us about your supply chain. How did you go about sourcing materials and finding a production partner?

Finding a production partner in footwear and accessories is probably the most time consuming and costly part of launching.  Since I had many years of working in the industry, I had contacts that trusted me and my aesthetic and knew that I understood the business. I started there.

Now that the brand is a little more established, it’s easier to get in the door with a new supplier but it still takes time and trial and error to find the right manufacturing partner. If you start out too demanding they will be turned off, but if you are too soft, production may be delayed or poorly executed. It is a fine balance.

I also recommend working within the strengths of each manufacturer, and not pushing them too quickly into new production techniques without enough time to test. Every material reacts differently in each design — this is the trial and error part that can get costly and time consuming — but is extremely important for a brand seeking longevity in the market.

Because our mission is to work with responsibly-sourced and environmentally-conscious materials, I feel I need to source myself as I know my manufacturers will not ask the same questions that I will. We invest a lot in our materials because that is what differentiates our brand from the others in the market. I’ve had to take very expensive trips into little, tiny towns with no transport just to meet with a supplier. Often those with the most beautiful and exciting materials are the most difficult to find. Sometimes it’s not worth it, but the more effort you put in the more it will show. Materials are the first thing a customer sees and feels about your product. That first touch will connect them with your brand in a real way that words or images cannot.

ALDEN BOOT IN NUDE HAND PAINTED CORK-4

What have you found to be your best marketing strategy?

Marketing is important, but it can be a waste of time and resources if there is no demand for your product.  I recommend designers make a first sample of their product and try to sell that (to a stranger) before spending a year on a business plan. Once you know that you have a market that is in tune with your aesthetic and price point, then go all out with your marketing strategy.

When marketing it’s important to start testing because I found that I accidentally stumbled upon some of my most effective communication strategies. We recently collaborated on a small capsule collection for the holidays with NYC-based Vaute Couture. It was our first collaboration with another brand and it came about very naturally from having met Leanne (the founder) at an event that we were both speaking at.

It was something that was exciting for both brands because it was new and our products complimented each other.  This natural excitement and anticipation was evident in our social media and e-mail marketing communication, it wasn’t forced. Customers are more savvy than ever. I think they can tell when a brand has been over-strategic and a message is over-explained.  I think it’s important to embark upon projects and events that truly excite you.

For me, marketing is exciting and an area for entrepreneurs to truly show their creativity and ingenuity. If this is not your strength, you need to find someone who does love telling your story and partner with them. Someone has to hear about you somehow. Overall, you need to trust your gut, and if you see too many people trying the same approach like the same website style, or e-mail pop-up, then it’s important to think of a new way to do it, you never know what you’ll create!

What advice do you have for aspiring entrepreneurs who want to start their own ethical apparel / accessories companies?

This may seem a bit harsh, but it’s something that has stuck with me through my career as a designer.  While attending Parsons, I had one the most notoriously critical professors. He felt he was doing his students a favor by showing them how tough the industry was, often making them cry and drop out.  I actually don’t think this technique would probably be too welcomed these days, but back then it was one of the aspects that gave Parsons their reputation of graduating the best.

Anyway, when we would present our designs for a critique, his term for bad design was “markdown.” Meaning, you may think you have just created the coolest design ever, but if you truly think about it, is it possible that what you love most about your design could cause it to end up on the “markdown” rack at Century21?

Try to visualize your customer walking into a store, trying on your design, and loving the way it feels. If you can’t see this happening, or have too many design details that would create what is referred to in marketing as “friction” or too many doubts from making the purchase, you may have a “markdown” on your hands.

To run a company, you need a balance of “best sellers”  and some “editorial” pieces. This balance is something we are still figuring out, but it gets easier as you go along. I can think of a design or two that I was personally so in love with when I should have been more critical. But you learn as you go. It’s one thing to design something we would love to see someone wear, but it’s quite another to get someone to spend a good amount of their hard earned money on your vision of how to dress.

To check out the Bhava online store and upcoming spring collection click here.

An Inspiration Board for Creatives: Meet Tina of Factory45

This is a guest post from Factory45’er, Tina Hofer Medico.

I’m Tina Hofer Medico, an interior designer for highly-creative businesses and the people who run ‘em — and the creator of The Spark Board.

As a designer, I love having the freedom to play, scribble, scrawl and make a total mess — when I’m in creative mode. But I also appreciate having a chic, tidy and sophisticated workspace at the end of the day — especially since I’m usually working from home!

I’ve also learned that I need to SEE my dreams, goals and intentions, right in front of my eyes, every single day. If they’re tucked away in a drawer (or filed away on my hard drive) they’re never going to get the attention they deserve.

One day, a bolt of brilliance hit me — what if there was a functional tool that could serve as a beautiful inspiration board by day, and transform into a modern art piece, by night?

An inspiration board that represents so much more — a life of creative passion and productivity, but also balance & work-life proportion.

I searched high and low, but I couldn’t find what I wanted.

So I decided to invent it, myself.

And with that, The SPARK Board was born.

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The Spark Board is a dedicated space for the projects that make you come alive. In a world filled with mundane tasks and endless to-do lists, it is a respite – a sacred space where you can keep your flame burning bright – a place where you come to renew your sense of possibility and engage in the act of creating your dreams and bringing your vision to life.

Follow along as I document The Spark Board Story at TinaHoferMedico.com. I’m diving into the details of how the idea was born, the process of creating it over the last two years and the serendipity of mentors, suppliers & manufacturers that have helped transform this from an idea in my imagination to an actual piece of furniture going into production just a few months from today!

Inside Factory45: The Making of the Bicycle Wrap Skirt

This is a guest post by Lara Neece, founder of Forest and Fin. You can read the original version here.

What happens when you love wearing skirts, love riding bikes, and like to make everything yourself? A Bicycle Wrap Skirt, of course – a skirt that’s dressy enough for the office or going out with with friends, but with a few simple adjustments, is ready to hop on a bike and be on the move in minutes. I spent years biking in skirts, and years trying to find the perfect skirt that I could wear just about anywhere without a second thought. My husband can tell you that there have been many, many days in which I’ve made him wait, while I changed clothes, just so we could bike to lunch or dinner or to the park because I didn’t want to worry about my skirt on the bike. The perfect skirt just didn’t exist.

forestandfinskirt2Forest and Fin began back in 2009, when I first started screen-printing, moved onto a sailboat, and decided to become an artist. Back then, I didn’t have a clue what I was doing (you could still argue that’s true now! ), but I had the passion and desire to learn. In the beginning, I screenprinted my drawings of plants and animals onto tshirts, and you can still purchase them in my shop today. But Forest and Fin is undergoing an evolution. It’s adapting and growing; my mission and goals are becoming clearer. I’m an artist and a designer, not just a screenprinter. My screenprinted designs and apparel were the starting point and a way for me to support myself while I developed my art and business, but now I am branching into new products that better embrace my mission, a mission to help people spend more time outside.

Over the past few years, in my search for blank items to print on, I ran into problems sourcing items that were both affordable and fit my aesthetic vision. In addition to being sustainable and earthy, I wanted my products to be functional, efficient (multi-use), and give back to the planet in some small way. I am focusing on a line of sustainably-made-in-the-USA everyday wear and household items, starting with a functional wrap skirt (the Bicycle Wrap Skirt) that includes bicycle friendly features and extra pockets. I am planning to dye the skirts blue or green and depending on the color will donate a small percentage of profits towards ocean (blue) or forest (green) conservation efforts.

forestandfinskirtWhile I’m still in the early phases of product development, I have a prototype that works (really!) and I plan to document the rest of the journey here. I hope that you’ll join this discussion and weigh in on features of the design to help me streamline the perfect skirt. This is going to be a staple in my wardrobe (and maybe yours too!), so it needs to be durable, high quality, sustainable, classy, fun, and above all functional. I’ve put together a short survey with questions about design features, colors, pricing, etc. and would love for you (yes, you!) to weigh in on the design while I am still in the development stage. Your input will be essential in shaping the final outcome.

Take the Bicycle Wrap Skirt Design Survey here.

For more about Forest and Fin, check it out here.

(Photo credit: Forest and Fin)

From Pre-Med to Design School: Meet Jesse of Factory45

This is a guest post by Factory45’er Jesse Syswerda, founder of Eenvoud.

The Beginning

My story begins on a frozen night in 2009. I was a senior in college, pre-med and creatively starving. In the wee hours one Michigan night, I started a fashion blog (at that time, fashion blogs were just coming into their prime). I named it ‘The Modern Muse’, photographed and wrote for it almost every day and put all of myself into it. Fast forward nine months, and in lieu of taking the MCATS, I found myself working at a fashion startup in New York City. It was a ballsy move, but one that I felt I didn’t really have a choice in. Starting that blog that one night was one of the best things I’ve ever done.

I spent the next four years trying to find my place in the creative fashion space in New York. I worked as an intern at a fashion startup called StyleCaster, as an assistant stylist on editorial photo shoots, as a freelance writer for sites like Fashionista and Yahoo! and as an account manager at a creative agency. While each position taught me much, those four years left me feeling unsatisfied; in my mind I was just moving around content that others had already created. I wanted to be at the start of it all. I wanted to be a designer.

The Middle

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Risk is something that I’ve healthily practiced in my short lifespan (I’m 27), so in 2012 I took another leap far away from my stable job and into the Associates Program in Fashion Design at Parsons. My ex-boss thought I was nuts. I told him I wanted to start my own design company. He thought I was even more nuts. So I went for it.

Parsons was a blur of fabric, pattern paper, all-nighters, steep learning curves, major highs, some sticky situations, great new friends and figuring out who I wanted to be as a designer. I’ve always been a minimalist, a bit of tomboy and knew that I wanted to create the elevated basics that I struggled so hard to find; the clothing that you don’t think about while wearing because it’s so you. The pieces in people’s wardrobes that have become an extension of themselves. The garments that you keep fixing so you can wear them over and over.

I felt that the industry was comprised of too much of everything – too many designs, too many seasons, too much turn-over, all made too quickly. During this phase, two other things happened: I took a few sustainability classes and I started working as a fit model, which exposed me to the behind-the-scenes of the design world. I started to learn how poorly and cheaply most garments were made, how quickly things were shipped back and forth to Asia, how low the ethical standards were for many workers, how harmful the materials and dyes many designers were using for both the environment and for the people who were wearing them. When I left Parsons, I knew what I had to do. I had to create the sustainably-made, elevated basics that I couldn’t find on the market.

The Present

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Since graduating, I’ve been working on EENVOUD, which means ‘simplicity’ in Dutch. The plus side of my design and fit modeling background is that I’m doing the pattern-making myself in my studio and fitting on myself (which is a funny sight). My first round of garments will be mainly made in a fabric called cupro, which is a bi-product of the cotton industry. It feels like a beautiful washed silk, but is actually made from a silky strand that is wrapped around the cotton seed and is normally discarded during cotton production. The major plus side of cupro is that unlike silk, it’s machine washable. We’ll move into production in New York this fall.

The Future

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My mission is to create beautiful, consciously-made basics that will live with you for years. To keep garments in production for years past their season so that you can come back to a loved garment or fit. To focus on aesthetics and updates in the sustainability world as it evolves. Essentially, to create the essence of a cherished menswear brand — for women.

To continue following Jesse’s story you can keep in touch on Instagram here.