video shoot, fashion video shoot, tips, startup advice

A Filmmaker’s “Do’s & Don’ts” of a Fashion Video Shoot

Last week, I spent a whirlwind 14-hour day with the film team behind Falcon Related to reshoot 25 videos for the Factory45 program.

We had five sets, hair and makeup, and four people working within a 800 sq. ft. space. I’ve done a bunch of shoots over the years and although this was our most ambitious, it was the most professional and well organized — by far.

So, naturally, it got me thinking about why this shoot was so much smoother than the others and what observations I can pass along to all of you.

If you’re planning a video shoot for your fashion brand in the future — whether it’s a Kickstarter video, a lookbook shoot, a commercial or even a YouTube series — then read on.

I’ve asked Kestrel and Drew of Falcon Related to join me in sharing their best “Do’s and Don’ts” of a successful fashion shoot.

SHANNON

DO:

  • Include a teleprompter in your equipment list. If you’re shooting a video that requires you to talk directly to the camera, then it’s absolutely worth asking your film team to include a teleprompter with their rental equipment. It can be as simple as an iPad with a reflective screen and there are tons of teleprompter apps you can download. This one trick has saved me HOURS — if not days — and will make the delivery of your script 100% better than it would if you tried to memorize, look at cue cards or ad-lib.
  • Create a timeline for the day. Your shoot is going to take longer than you plan for — that’s pretty much guaranteed. But you should absolutely create a timeline for the day so you at least have benchmarks to keep you on schedule. If you’re shooting outside, then you’ll need to know what time the sun sets. Our shoot went four hours over our timeline, but we didn’t need natural light. Make sure you have a backup plan if things run long and give yourself a buffer in the schedule.
  • Have snacks & arrange for lunch. My blood sugar crashed way before we were set to break for lunch. Luckily, I had planned ahead and bought healthy snacks the night before. You’ll want to make sure you do everything possible to keep your energy up — and even more importantly, the energy of your crew, models and team. Avoid salty foods or snacks with processed sugar that will cause high’s and low’s. We had nuts, raspberries, bananas, yogurt-covered raisins and dried mango and it kept everyone going until lunch. And yes, if you’re on location you’ll want to arrange for lunch to be delivered before the break that you’ve scheduled on your timeline.

DON’T:

  • Skimp for the cheapest option. Like most things in life, you get what you pay for. Of course there are the rare occasions when a novice can create a beautiful video, but that’s typically not the case. Depending on the depth of the project, you should expect to pay between $3-5K to hire a film team that knows what it’s doing. More than the price tag on the project, though, don’t…
  • Hire someone without seeing their past work. This is probably the most important piece of advice I can give you when it comes to finding and hiring your team. A professional filmmaker should have a portfolio or reel, as well as an Instagram feed where you can get a taste of their past work. Everyone has different styles and you need to find the film team that aligns with the style of your brand.

KESTREL & DREW

DO:

  • Create a shot list. This helps both sides (video team and designer/brand) understand what absolutely needs to be accomplished during the shoot. While it’s always fun to stray and embrace the creativity of the moment, the shot list serves as a great guide to help you get the most out of your shoot.
  • Have patience. Preparing for each shot isn’t going to happen in five minutes. There are many factors involved beyond the camera and the photographer. From the lighting and gear to the framing and audio, these individual components don’t come together without time, orientation to detail, and teamwork.
  • Keep communicating. After production day, the editing begins. As a designer/brand, it’s important to have a clear vision for your end product before the editor gets to work. Being able to communicate how you envision your video appearing will really help bring a project together.

DON’T:

  • Go with the cheapest option. You want to create the highest quality product possible, so try to find the best production value, while keeping your budget in mind.
  • Get disorganized with your feedback. When it comes to the details of the editing process, it can get really overwhelming. Organize all your edits and thoughts into one place – a Google doc works great. This allows you to clearly see which edits you’ve shared with the editor, and allows the editor to “cross out” your edits once they’ve been addressed. Maintaining this clear back and forth allows the final product to come to fruition faster.

To learn more about Falcon Related’s work, go here. You may recognize some past Factory45’ers : )

 

 


How to Change the Power of Your Thoughts to Better Your Business

“You’re going to fail.”

“You’ve got this.”

“You can’t pull that off.”

“You are fully capable.”

“Nobody cares what you have to say.”

“Your voice matters.”

And back and forth it goes…

It’s the see-saw in your brain that teeters from thought to thought.

It’s why, in the blink of an eye, you can go from feeling GREAT to being on the floor in the fetal position.

As entrepreneurs, we are all too familiar with the monkey mindgame.

“This is the idea! We are going to making MILLIONS!”

… five minutes later …

“There’s already another company doing this?! FML!!!!!”

The bad news is: this mindgame is probably never going to fully go away. (Unless you become a perfect Buddhist or super Zen master or something.)

The good news is: you can become better at managing it so that your thoughts don’t derail you.

And on that note, I’d like you to meet Herschel and Alice.

Herschel is a pain in the you-know-what. He’s a huge worry-wart, always has his panties in a bunch and can never seem to relaaaaax.

He’s the voice in my head that’s constantly concerned with whether my ideas are good enough or if I’m going to fail. I know that deep down he’s just trying to protect me, but he can come across as really negative and very annoying.

Alice, on the other hand, could win awards for Miss Congeniality. She’s calm, soothing and never let’s anything bother her. She knows that everything will work out, and she believes in me. She’s the most supportive cheerleader who ever existed — without the pom-poms.

At the risk of sounding like I’m schizophrenic, Herschel and Alice have gotten me through nearly a decade of entrepreneurship.

When I was first starting out I was… in a word… dramatic.

Things bothered me easily, every obstacle seemed like the end of the world, and I dwelled over the bad things far more than I celebrated the good things.

And then, about four years in, I did something that drastically changed the power of my thoughts.

I named them.

Instead of tying the negative thoughts to my self-worth, I started recognizing them as a worried friend who was simply looking out for me.

When I thought about falling on my face or screwing something up I was able to say:

“Hey Herschel, thanks for looking out for me, buddy, but I’ve got this. Don’t worry so much.”

And then Alice could chime in and take over the conversation.

By shifting to this perspective, it can do two things for you:

1. It creates distance between you and your negative thoughts. We are what we think, and when we’re able to separate the toxic thoughts from how we view ourselves, then we are that much closer to a more positive and healthier life and business.

2. It ends the negative spiral faster. As soon as you feel yourself going towards the sink hole of self doubt, you can think to yourself, “What would Alice say?” (or whatever you name your cheerleader.)

Because the thing is, if you want to be an entrepreneur then you have to get Herschel under control.

Failing to do so means you’ll never take risks, you’ll question every decision you make and worst of all — you won’t enjoy the journey.

Your thoughts will hold you back if you let them and if we look back in history —

Nothing truly great was ever created from fear.

 

 

 

 

This post was inspired by my friend and former business coach Amber Rae.

 


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The (Not-So) Secret Weapon for Every Startup Fashion Brand

“Which did you prefer….

Having a business partner or not having one?”

This question often comes up when I’m working with new entrepreneurs, because I’m in the uncommon position of having experienced both.

My first company, a sustainable clothing line, was my first taste of entrepreneurship and I worked with a co-founder for two years.

My current company, Factory45, is a business I started on my own as a “solopreneur.”

Of course there are pros and cons to both scenarios. (And for the record, I loved having a business partner.)

When you have a partner you only have half the workload.

When you’re solo you have all of the control.

When you have a partner you have someone to celebrate the wins and falls with.

When you’re solo you aren’t responsible to anyone else.

I could probably list out 50 other reasons to advocate for both, but there is one pro of having a business partner that takes the cake above all else.

And it’s this:

Accountability.

When you start a business with another person it’s a lot harder to give up.

For all the ways that having autonomy as a solopreneur is great, there is an intangible X factor that comes from having someone in the trenches with you.

Having said that, working with a business partner isn’t a natural fit for everyone. It takes a very special partnership to be able to work through the highs and lows of entrepreneurship together.

If you don’t have a business partner or if you don’t see one in your future, then my suggestion is to surround yourself with some sort of community.

Ever since I decided four years ago to start a business on my own, I’ve hired coaches, taken online programs and joined “mastermind” groups, knowing that I needed other people around to cheer me on.

It wasn’t enough to simply say, “I’m starting a business. See you in three years when I pull myself out of the hole in my home office.”

The entrepreneurs who have come through Factory45 will be the first to tell you how invaluable their peers have been in the infancy of their businesses.

Community is, quite simply, everything.

So, how do you go about finding it? Here are a few options:

  • My top recommendation is the online community at Startup FASHION. I’ve introduced you before to my friend Nicole (you may recall the interview I did with her here) — and she has created a global network of startup designers.

As I tell my Factory45’ers, joining Startup FASHION is the next natural step after graduating from Factory45, and I’d highly recommend it to anyone who is beyond “idea or early stage” of starting their line. Enrollment is opened for this week here and is super affordable for budget-conscious entrepreneurs. (Update: enrollment is now closed.)

  • Check out your local incubator, accelerator or co-working hub. The fashion hotspots like LA and NYC will have multiple options but you’ll be surprised by what you can find in cities like Boston, San Francisco, Austin and Raleigh. If you’re the type of person who craves personal connections in a physical space, then simply co-working with a few fellow entrepreneurs can do the trick.
  • Join an online program that offers personal mentorship and a community component. While there are many online programs out there, not all are created equal. Identify whether having a community is important to you and seek out the programs and courses that include that personal connection. (On that note: we have set an official open applications date for the 2017 program of Factory45: mark your calendars for May 17th.)

And if you’re the type of person who can work by themselves for hours on end, then more power to you. Keep doing what you’re doing — just remember to come out of the hole every once in awhile ; )

 

 


Report: The State of Sustainable Fashion Entrepreneurship 2016

“You know what you should do?” said my friend Lorraine, who is the founder of the Spirit of 608 podcast. “You should create a report.”

“A report, like…” I trailed off, wondering where this was going.

“You know, like a media report that shows the state of sustainable fashion entrepreneurship. You could interview some of the designers you’ve worked with, poll your community and put together something with infographics and graphs that show your findings.”

I knew that following the Rana Plaza tragedy in 2013, there has been a surge of entrepreneurial interest in ethical manufacturing practices.

And after three years working with over 150 early-stage sustainable fashion brands, I knew that I could capture the shifts and trends I’m seeing daily.

We wondered if there was a way to also show what this means for the future of the fashion industry.

So after our conversation, I got to work.

And thanks to Lorraine’s help and encouragement, the participation of some of my most dedicated Factory45’ers and the execution of my talented graphic designer, today I’m releasing Factory45’s report on The State of Sustainable Fashion Entrepreneurship 2016.

This 13-page study contains original case studies, infographics and anecdotes from 30 exclusive interviews with independent designers, as well as findings such as:

  • 82% of the brands interviewed know the people who make their products are paid a fair and living wage. Compared to 2% of traditional retailers.
  • 100% of the brands interviewed know where their products are made. Compared to 61% of traditional retailers.
  • 88% of the brands interviewed feel there is more access to sustainable supply chains than there was five years ago.
  • It now requires 99% less in startup capital to start an independent brand than in 2014.

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Despite what the mainstream fashion industry wants you to think, it is now easier than ever before to launch an independent fashion label. And with persistence, there are new sustainable and ethical brands proving every day that it can be done.

You can read the full report here.

And if you like what you read, please share the link with your network. I’ve put together an easy copy-and-paste description to go with it:

Factory45 has released its 2016 report on the State of Sustainable Fashion Entrepreneurship. Did you know that it now requires 99% less in startup capital to start an independent brand than in 2014? Read the full report here: http://bit.ly/2fDrsop

Thank you so much for reading and sharing.

With your support, I’m looking forward to bringing even more sustainable fashion to the marketplace in 2017.

 

 

 

 

P.S. If you are a blogger or reporter and would like to use the report for a future story, please contact me directly at shannon@factory45.co.

6 Sustainable Fashion Projects to Watch in 2017: The Experts Weigh In

It’s the third annual edition of sustainable fashion projects to watch in the new year and below you’ll find our favorites.

I asked the experts to share the projects, designers, brands and technology that they’re most excited to follow in 2017. Enjoy!


lorraine-opalwall-headshot-9-7-16“There’s this incredible ecosystem of business resources, services and programs set up to help fashion brands incorporate more sustainable practices into what they’re doing, and it wasn’t that way even two years ago. Some to watch are obviously Factory45 (duh!), Startup Fashion, ProjectEntrepreneur and TrendSeeder.

I am also paying close attention to the necessary interconnectedness of sustainability in fashion, where you see companies like Evrnu partnering with Levi’s and The Renewal Workshop teaming up with multiple brands to present new ways of thinking about the lifecycle of the clothes we wear.”

Lorraine Sanders, Founder of PressDope by Spirit of 608 and host of the Spirit of 608 podcast


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“I’m really excited about the emergence of sustainable undergarment brands. It used to be that there were so few choices that you could feel good about. Now they’re popping up everywhere and range from the fancier styles of NAJA, which has a women-focused social mission, to the fun styles of La Vie En Orange, which recycles your t-shirts into cute cotton undies.”

Nicole Giordano, Founder of Startup Fashion


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“This year, I’m excited by brands that are blurring the traditional boundaries of fashion. New brands like Kirrin Finch are filling a void for (proper-fitting) menswear-inspired womenswear as established companies like Burberry make mixed gender shows a fixture of fashion week.

In addition, the concept of quality clothing that purposefully endures through sizes and seasons is resurfacing among sustainable lines: Sotela designs dresses that span several sizes while the made-to-order brand DE SMET rejects the fashion calendar to release just one piece per month over the course of the year.”

Elizabeth Stilwell, Creator of The Note Passer and Co-Founder of the Ethical Writers Coalition


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“From yeast-based synthetic spider silk to hybrid fabrics that convert solar power and movement into electricity, fashion innovation will continue to soar to new heights in the new year. But I think that more low-tech pursuits such as knitting, crocheting, and sewing will also see a resurgence, particularly in these uncertain political times, when getting down to brass tacks and working with our hands will bring a more visceral level of comfort.

I’d keep my eyes peeled, in particular, for organizations such as the Craftivist Collective, which uses the art of craft as a vehicle for “gentle activism,” and Knit Aid, which provides refugees with lovingly hand-knit blankets, scarves, gloves, and hats. On a personal note, I’m currently knitting my fourth Pussyhat Project hat for the upcoming Women’s March on Washington. It’s easy to surrender to feelings of hopelessness, but we can rally everything we have against the tide of tyranny and hatred. There is strength in numbers, and it can begin with a single stitch.”

Jasmin Malik Chua, Managing Editor of Ecouterre


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“I’m excited to see Increasing alternatives to leather come to the market. Right now most faux leather ‘vegan’ options are plastic-based, which of course is not compostable. But with pineapple-based and even mushroom leather alternatives becoming available, I’m hoping we’ll start to see more and more of them available on a larger scale!”

 

Rachel Kibbe, Founder of Helpsy


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“Because of where I stand in the fashion space, I’m lucky to see sustainable startups launching new projects on a regular basis. The ones that I get really excited about are pushing the boundaries of branding, storytelling and marketing to say something different about what it means to be an ‘ethical’ and ‘sustainable’ apparel brand.

Some of the companies that stand out right now are Girlfriend Collective that opted out of traditional advertising and used their budget to get their product into the hands of their customers. Factory45’er Peche is pushing the boundaries of the lingerie industry by making undergarments for every “body” and defying gender norms. And then there’s mompreneur brand SproutFit that is challenging traditional sizing for infants and toddlers by making garments adjust as the baby grows.

If I’ve learned anything over the past several years working with sustainable fashion startups it’s that the companies that get people excited are the ones who tell a different story. It’s those unique stories that I’ll be keeping my eye on this year.”

Shannon Lohr, Founder of Factory45


Is there a sustainable fashion project / designer / business / technology you’re excited to watch in 2017? Share this post using the buttons to the left and add a comment with your project of choice.

A big thanks to everyone who contributed and a happy new year to all.

 

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5 Reflections from Working with Over 100 Fashion Startups

On Friday, we wrapped up the final day of the Factory45 2016 program. (A special shout-out and congratulations to this year’s entrepreneurs.)

Last week marked 2.5 years since Factory45 started and the ‘graduation’ of my fourth cohort of ‘Factory45’ers.’

As many of us do this time of year, I’ve been reflecting on the conclusion of this chapter. And today I want to share the five main takeaways that I’ve observed from working with over 100 entrepreneurs in the past 2 years:

1. You are capable of more than you think.

In the first month of Factory45 my entrepreneurs start by sourcing fabric and materials. It’s the part of the process that takes the longest, and it can often require the entire six months of the program to find the perfect fabric.

Anyone who has tried sourcing before knows that not only does it take time, but it can be very frustrating. Many of my entrepreneurs are hesitant to reach out to suppliers out of sheer fear of the unknown.

And then a light switches on.

By the middle of the program, they’re giving each other tips, sharing leads on materials they’ve found, and offering advice about how to connect with an extra busy supplier.

Like anything new, it takes practice to become a pro. But you’re capable of more than you think you are.

And if you give it a chance, it will happen quicker than you expect it to.


2. Attitude is the number one indication of success.

On the final day of Factory45 this year, I sent an email to my entrepreneurs that began as follows:

Yesterday I was watching a video, explaining a method of thinking for entrepreneurs called the ‘Ow’ or ‘Wow’ Brain.

The psychologist was sharing research that found that the success of an entrepreneur isn’t about talent or starting capital or socioeconomic background or looks or knowledge.

It’s about attitude.

The entrepreneurs who are successful are the ones who look at their progress in terms of how far they’ve come rather than how far they have to go.

You could sum this up as the ‘half glass full’ philosophy.

I’ve done a lot of research about what makes some people ‘successful’ and what makes others stall out and falter. And it almost always comes down to attitude.

Successful entrepreneurs not only know they can do it, but they aren’t afraid of overcoming obstacles along the way.

3. Time can either be your friend or your foe.

We all start out with 24 hours in a day. It’s our job to decide what we’re going to do with those hours.

There’s a theory that a task will take you as much time as you allow it to. So if you say you’re going to launch in three months it will take you those entire three months. If you say you’ll launch in one year, then the study says you’ll stretch out that same launch to take you the full year.

It’s normal as an entrepreneur to feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day, but it’s the levelest playing field we have with our competition. The entrepreneurs who are able to get time on their side, are the ones who set hard deadlines and stick to them.

4. Start before you’re ready.

I’ve shared before that this is my single best piece of advice for aspiring entrepreneurs who want to launch their own clothing brands.

While some of the entrepreneurs I worked with this year had already been pursuing their businesses before they joined Factory45, the vast majority came through the program with just an idea.

When you start before you’re ready you initiate forward momentum. The feeling of moving forward little by little is what protects ideas from vanishing into thin air.

If you have an idea that you truly believe in, then you can increase its chances of survival by simply making the commitment to start.

5. Entrepreneurship is a battle between the heart and the mind.

Your mind will come up with as many excuses as it can to stop you from pursuing something it perceives as ‘risky.’ If you let it, the rational mind can easily overthrow the aspirational heart.

Our hearts are what keep us moving forward on an idea that the mind tells us is nothing more than a pipedream. Knowing and expecting that, you are better prepared for an ongoing battle.

Instead of letting the mind inhibit you from taking risks, reframe the fear. Recognize that the mind is just trying to protect you, but the part of your brain that initiates ‘fear-based thinking’ doesn’t have the last say.

Allow your heart to say, “I hear you. Thank you for trying to protect me, but I’ve got this.”

The more you practice this back and forth dialogue, you’ll find that the fear-talk in the mind starts to weaken. You’ll hear it less frequently and then it simply becomes…

A matter of the heart.

 

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What’s the difference? Factory45 vs. The Crowdfunding Factory

“Sisters, not twins.”

That’s what I told my web designer when we first started talking about the branding and design for The Crowdfunding Factory.

I said it needed to be clear that The Crowdfunding Factory was not the same as Factory45, but more like its little sister…

And that’s when we became two normal people talking about websites as if they were humans.

: )

But in all seriousness, I know there might be some confusion about how The Crowdfunding Factory is different from Factory45 and today I want to get really clear on that.

Factory45 is a six-month online accelerator program that takes sustainable apparel companies from idea to launch — including sourcing, pre-production, manufacturing, marketing, selling and crowdfunding.

Applications only open once per year so I can work closely with one dedicated cohort of entrepreneurs at a time.

There is 1-on-1 support, group calls and a community element that creates an exclusive experience for those people who want to build their companies in a sustainable and ethical way.

The tuition for Factory45 is $500/month for six months, and I can be as involved in helping you build your business as you want me to be.

The Crowdfunding Factory is a new course I just launched last week that acts as a stepping stone to Factory45. It’s for the people who are eager to join Factory45, but they don’t want to wait until the spring to get started on planning their launch.

As you’ll learn in my courses, a detailed marketing strategy that takes you to pre-selling on Kickstarter are the two main pillars of a successful fashion brand launch.

When you begin your launch strategy with The Crowdfunding Factory, you’re getting a huge head start on creating a campaign that will ultimately fuel every other aspect of your business.

And the best part? Come spring, when you’re ready to join Factory45, you’ll have a marketing strategy in place that you’re ready to implement.

Which of course, means that you’ll have more time and energy to devote to sourcing the perfect materials and working on product development.

So, that just about sums it up.

  • If you plan to join Factory45 in the spring, then The Crowdfunding Factory is for you — and you’ll receive $500 off your Factory45 tuition, which is one month free.
  • If you already have your samples and manufacturing lined up, then The Crowdfunding Factory is also for you. It’s the next best step to taking your brand from pre-production to pre-sales.

My intention with all of this is to set you up with several different ways to be successful.

Enrollment is open here and it closes on Wednesday, February 15 at midnight EST.

 

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How the Founder of Sotela Raised Over $20,000 to Start a Womenswear Brand

Many of you know Hanna Baror-Padilla, who is one of my past Factory45 entrepreneurs and is now the founder of a womenswear brand called Sotela.

Hanna is a prime example that you don’t have to have thousands of dollars sitting in the bank nor endless amounts of free time to launch a clothing brand.

In fact, while Hanna was preparing to launch her clothing company through Kickstarter this year, she was working a full time job and commuting two hours each way.

I’ll never forget meeting her for brunch in L.A. last spring and hearing about the ungodly hour she would wake up every morning to go to work and then the equally ungodly hour she would get home from work.

Hanna is proof that if you want something bad enough, then you find a way to make time for it.

So, after a year of saving up money and dedicating her nights and weekends to building her campaign, Hanna launched Sotela with a Kickstarter this past May.

And she raised over $20,000 to fund her first production run.

As much as I can tell you how great crowdfunding is and how I know that it’s the very best option for you to launch your brand, I wanted to bring Hanna in to tell you about her own experience.

In this interview for Factory45 LIVE, Hanna and I talked about:

  • How she went from simply having an idea to actually getting started.
  • Why she chose Kickstarter as her launch platform and the other methods of raising money that she considered.
  • What she did to initially prepare for her campaign and how long she prepared for.
  • The strategies she attributes to the success of her Kickstarter.
  • What life looks like for her now… and more.

If you even have the slightest feeling that you think you might want to run a Kickstarter campaign someday, then you’ll hugely benefit from hearing the personal experience of someone who has done it before.

Watch the recording here.

 

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The Crowdfunding Factory Launches Next Week!

Six years ago, I told my friends and family that I was starting a business.

The kicker was, I didn’t have an idea yet.

I had found someone crazy enough to start the “business” with me, and I figured that was enough of a reason to keep going.

The first idea we came up with was to start an import / export business of fair trade textiles and artifacts, so we booked one-way tickets to Guatemala.

My then co-founder and I arranged to live with a host family so that we could learn Spanish in a month and start building partnerships with artisan cooperatives around the country.

Were we naive?

Um, yeah.

Did our original idea pan out?

Not even a little bit.

Did we learn something more valuable in the process?

Absolutely.

A year after we returned from Central America, we did in fact launch a business but it looked nothing like our original vision.

In retrospect, I could look back on the costs of flights, room and board, Spanish lessons, transportation and other travel expenses as money down the drain.

I could have thought:

“If only we had just known from the beginning that we’d end up designing a piece of clothing, manufacturing in the U.S. and launching with a Kickstarter campaign… Think of all of the money we could have saved!”

But for all of that money lost, you couldn’t put a price on what I learned.

It’s the one piece of advice that I’ve taken with me over the years.

It’s the one piece of advice that I tell all of the entrepreneurs I work with.

And it’s the one piece of advice that I hope you’ll take to heart today:

Start before you’re ready.

Why?

Because starting before you’re ready isn’t about being underprepared or unsure of yourself.

Starting before you’re ready is actually a marketing strategy.

It’s a strategy that you can use to build a business and generate customers before you’ve even launched.

And I’m going to show you how.

Next week, on Tuesday, November 15th, I’m opening enrollment to The Crowdfunding Factory. (Update: Enrollment is now closed for 2016. Get on the list to be notified when enrollment opens in late 2017.)

This online training program is for fashion entrepreneurs who want to launch or grow their brands with the help of a Kickstarter campaign.

I’m going to show you how to raise money for your brand in a way that ensures you have an audience to launch to —

And guarantees that you have customers before you go into production.

If you know you need to raise money for your fashion startup, then make sure you’re signed up to be notified about early enrollment here.

 

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Introducing NOVEL SUPPLY CO: Conscious Apparel for the Urban Adventurer

This is an interview with Factory45’er Kaya Dorey about the launch of her brand NOVEL SUPPLY CO. With the help of a Kickstarter campaign, Kaya is raising money (update: has raised money) for her first production run of conscious apparel for the urban adventurer.

Can you give us a brief overview of your brand and the pieces you’re pre-selling?

NOVEL SUPPLY CO. is conscious apparel for the urban adventurer. My line is made up of three comfy, casual, gender neutral styles made from all natural hemp and organic cotton including:

The Cabin Crew, The Adventure Tee and The Muscle Tank.

My brand connects with adventurers who love active lifestyles and mindful living, but also care about their style. The goal for NOVEL is to provide people with conscious apparel that doesn’t sacrifice style. Rad graphics created by local artists keep our designs fresh and manufacturing locally allows for transparency throughout the manufacturing process.

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Why did you choose to launch your brand through Kickstarter?

I chose Kickstarter because I was familiar with the platform and I had seen several other entrepreneurs (including Shannon and my fellow Factory45’ers) have success with their campaigns.

Kickstarter’s branding is super on point and their website is easy to navigate so I thought it would be the best fit for my campaign. Also, the demographic of people that use Kickstarter, or even know what it is, fit with my target market.

You’ve done months of prep. What helped you keep up your momentum and motivation?

As I am still working full-time to help fund my business and life, it was crucial that I work somewhere that was relatively flexible, with people who supported me from the get-go. I am so grateful for my team at work and their constant support and motivation.

Also, my guy – and marketing guru – has been an integral part in helping me to launch this campaign, manage my time and has been there every step of the way to cheer me on. He believes in me sometimes more than I believe in myself and has been crucial in keeping my fire stoked.

My friends and family have also helped me maintain momentum not only financially but also just by believing in my vision, connecting me with the people I need to know and constantly encouraging me to hustle.

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Can you give us a little insight into your campaign strategy? What has been working and what hasn’t worked as well?

Stoke my networks. The NOVEL tribe is made up of some of the raddest, most supportive people. They are the adventurers, they are the ones who make conscious decisions about what they buy, they are the ones who are making sustainability cool, and they love all things creative. They have also turned out to be the mavens of my campaign.

I am super lucky to have collaborated with some of the most talented and creative entrepreneurs in Vancouver and, because of that, I have a solid lineup of visual content that will help spread the word about NOVEL. Stay tuned 😉

What do you do when self doubt starts to creep up?

When self-doubt creeps up – which, I can tell you, it does – I go to the mountains, I have my friends over for a glass of wine, I have a good cry, I go stretch it out with some yoga, or take a timeout for myself and meditate. It’s the only way to tame a creative mind.

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What’s your favorite reward being offered in your campaign?

I love what I have come up with in terms of NOVEL apparel, and maybe I’m a little bit biased, but hey, my heart and soul is in The Muscle Tank, The Adventure Tee AND The Cabin Crew.

BUT, my favourite rewards being offered are the ones that I collaborated with others on! The growlers are sick! The handmade and hand-painted paddles are love at first sight! And, the designs, whether they are on the postcards, prints or NOVEL apparel are on point! It’s impossible to choose a favourite and I guess I haven’t really answered your question. Sarry.

If you had one piece advice for someone considering launching a Kickstarter, what would it be?

Adventure always!

You can check out Kaya’s campaign for NOVEL SUPPLY CO. here

 

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